Tuesday, 29 January 2019


Welcome to my final blog which, due to my accident is posted a little later than I anticipated.  I am of course, delighted that they war is at an end but I will miss the weekly readings and selected transcriptions of the newspaper. 
Many of the reports relate to the homecomings of prisoners of war and the joy that resonates from their return.  The larger piece from Brigg (at the end) is most revealing with regards to the treatment of British prisoners of war in Germany.  I have written a few final sentences at the end of the blog.

The Lincolnshire Star
Saturday 28th December 1918

BRIGG
A SOLDIER'S THANKS.- Sir, - Will you kindly allow me through the "Star" to thank the Committee and donors of the Brigg Soldiers' and Sailors' Parcels Fund for the 5s. postal order which I received.  I am sure that it made me feel that although we are far away, the people in the dear old home town have not forgotten us, and I hope that we shall all meet again before long in dear old Brigg.  - I remain, yours respectfully, Pte. J. W. Steeper, A Coy, West Yorks, Prisoner of War Camp, Malta.  Dec. 22nd, 1918.
HOME AGAIN.- On Saturday afternoon Private Phillips had a very hearty welcome home after having been a prisoner of war in Germany over four years.  On the outbreak of hostilities, Private Phillips, who was a reservist, was called to the colours and proceeded to France, where he was taken a prisoner after a few weeks fighting.  On arriving at the station Pte. Phillips was met by Mr. H. Stamp J.P. and a crowd of well-wishers and was then driven in a motor car to the Market Place were speeches of welcome were made. 


ELSHAM
HOME AGAIN.- Last week Private John Andrew, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Andrew, arrived home after being a prisoner of war.  He was wounded in the spring offensive and has had a rough time.  He returns to Grimsby Hospital.
FOR THE WOUNDED.- Since August 1917, 2,570 eggs have been collected and sent from the village to the National Egg Collection for the Wounded.  The total number of eggs sent since the first collection in February, 1915, amount to 9,000.  Thanks are due to all who have so consistently contributed.  
The National Egg Collection has been a regular report from somewhere in North Lincolnshire since the scheme was established in February 1915.


ULCEBY
GIFTS TO SOLDIERS.- Through the efforts made in the village by the juveniles and friends enough money has been raised to send the local men with H.M. Forces 10s. 6d. each this Xmas time.  A letter has also been sent to each one conveying the good wishes and a speedy return.  The committee desire to thank all who helped to make the effort such a success.


ASHBY
HOME AGAIN.- Private Tom Fox, of the Lincolns, and Private Sciles of the Coldstream Guards have arrived home after being prisoners of war in Germany. 


NORMANBY
PARK HOSPITAL.- Forty-one of the patients at the Park Hospital have gone home on leave.


ALKBORO
HOME.- After being a prisoner of war in Germany Private W. Chafer has arrived home.  He joined Kitchener's Army in 1914 being twice wounded.  He was taken prisoner in the spring offences.  Private P. Foster, M.M.  has also arrived home, after being wounded and taken prisoner this year.  Everyone in the village were pleased to see both home again.




BARROW
RETURNED.- Last week Lance-Cpl. T. W. Short, one of the  two sons of Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Short, formerly if this village, serving with H. M. Forces, arrived home in Manchester after being in Germany 9 months.  Private J. Stainton, East YorkS. Regt. has also arrived home, after being in the hands of the Germans for nearly two years. 


SCUNTHORPE
LIBERAL CLUB.- The effort made at the Liberal Club during the week-end resulted in a handsome gift being made to each of the following soldier members who are returned prisoners if war: Capt. H. Martin, Private J. Nicholson, T. S?? and C. Sporrage.

?? MEMORIAL. - This is a very long article and probably relates to the proposal of a Memorial Hospital discussed in last week's newspaper, but it is impossible to read.  You could try by going to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/



BRIGG LADS RELEASED FROM
CAPTIVITY
Several local soldiers who had the misfortune to be captured by the Germans have found their way back to civilisation greatly to the delight of those near and dear to them.  Owing to them returning at uncertain time, there has been no chance to meet them at the station and give them what they really deserve, a right royal welcome.  Up to Friday ? had arrived home at Brigg, and Mr. E. J. Clark was the first to moot a happy project and in co-operation with Mr. H. Stamp, J.P., considered it would be a splendid idea to ask them to the Council Chamber the same evening that the Council met.  A more appropriate time could not have been suggested and Mr. Stamp lost no time in making arrangements and each soldier received a reception.  Miss Brown , of Thornholme, who has done great work for the prisoners of war  was also invited and accepted the invitation, and a most inspiring welcome was arranged.
When the business of the Council had proceeded some little time, the Council Chamber door opened and the five lads filed their way to the chair, accompanied by Miss Brown.  One could not help but feel for them.  Some looked haggard and bore signs of the privations they had undergone as regards food, and looked as though they required something better than what they had had doled out to them at the hands of the German braggarts.
The lads briefly gave a review of their hardships.  The foul treatment meted out by the Huns, was according to expression, grafted in their being and it would have been an insult to them to have put the question if England should ever hold out her hand to Germany again.  
One told how he received his wages for nine months work and a modest "half dollar" was placed in his hand.  Illustrations like this must reflect upon those who are never satisfied with their w?? and who have during the war ? because, perhaps, they were getting £3 per week, and thought they ought to have £6.
Another stated that he, along with others, had to live on cabbage water for two days, because they refused to load shells for the front, their daily ration of bread being withheld.  We could go on describing the hardships they have endured, however, it is pleasing to note that warm hearts were awaiting them at home. 
In giving them a welcome Mr. Stamp addressed them as follows:- "In the name of the Council and the town we are all delighted to see you back.  We want to give you a royal welcome back to blighty and back to Brigg.  We have heard and thought about you, and Miss Brown has been seeking to look after you and we extended the invitation to that lady to be present this evening.  I know that you have heard from her many times but none too often.  We know give you a welcome from prison life and prison rations and are pleased that you are out of German hands and in the dear homeland.  I don't know whether you have congratulated yourselves or otherwise during your captivity.  It is the good providence of God that you have been preserved and we hope you will spend a happy Christmas and never be prisoner again.  
In conclusion Mr. Stamp said: "We have sympathised with you all the time but practical sympathy is best."  Mr. Stamp explained that there was a fund, and a wealthy fund, for prisoners of war, and they in due course would receive a share. Miss Brown who is interested in this fund would see that they got a share.  Muss Brown, at this juncture, expressed pleasure at their home coming and in words of sincere welcome, presented each with a £1 Treasury note.
Mr. E. J. Clark, Mr. G. V. Eccles and Mr. J. T. Kettle also expressed words of welcome back to Brigg.
The names of the returned men are:
Private Arthur Rhodes, 8th Lincoln's was captured by the Germans on 25th. September, 1915, at Loos.  Was employed making felt-roofing.  He was in camp Munster, Westphalia.  Released in November, 1918.  Received parcels from home.
Private Arthur Wray, 7th. Leicesters, was captured on 27th. May, 1918.  Worked behind the German line for the whole period, except 8 weeks in hospital. Suffered many hardships and was released early in December.
Private J. Booth, 2-6th. South Staffords, captured on 21st. March.  Worked in coal mines and paid 10d. for eight hours work.  Released 2nd. December.
Private Ernest Short, was captured on 16th. April.  Was at Marpent Camp working in salt mines and paid 10d. for eight hours work.  Released Nov. 22nd, 1918.  Was in the 12th Royal Irish Rifles.
Private Robt. Clark, 22nd Durham Light Infantry, was captured 27th May.  Worked down a coal mine and was paid 2s. 6d. for his eight months work.  Released on Dec. 2nd, 1918.
Private J. W. Turner, of Elwes St., was captured on April 10th,  and released on December 1st. 
A fascinating piece that, beyond the Council members' rhetoric gives an insight in to the conditions suffered by the prisoners of war.

Well, this is my last post.  I have covered every week bar one.  I will miss reading the newspaper and selecting and transcribing the extracts.   It has been a fascinating journey for me and has taught me a lot.  I intend to do some further research on particular issues and I will post my findings. 
The whole four years of war have been laid before us and I hope that you have found news from the Home Front in the North Lincolnshire district as interesting, and often moving, as I have.  It has been an important part of my life and will continue to be so.

Welcome to my chosen extracts taken from The Lincolnshire Star for Saturday 21st December 1918.  My penultimate blog.   Please don't forget that you can see the full newspaper by going to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/
Two military deaths are reported: Lance-Corpl. W. Short (Goxhill) who sadly, was killed in action on 6th November and Private Cyril Mapplethorpe (Ulceby) who died as a prisoner of war in Germany.
There are reports from across the district regarding prisoners of war coming home.  I have included all of them.  Some are very short but give an indication of the conditions they have been living in.  Happiness for those returning home, sadness for those who will never return.


The Lincolnshire Star
saturday 21st december 1918

BRIGG
FROM THE LITTLE ONES.- The children attending the Kindergarten Sunday School have contributed £1, to buy cigarettes for the Brigg men at Xmas.
This kind of report never fails to make me smile.  It wouldn't happen now!

LECTURE.- On Monday night an interesting lecture was given in the Primitive Methodist Chapel, by the Rev. C. H. Sheldrake on "The League of Nations."  The lecture which was a most thoughtful one was greatly appreciated by the good audience present.  At the close of the lecture several questions were asked and answered.  Mr. Thos. Danby presided.  
THE BENEFICE OF BRIGG.- From the "Parish Magazine" we learn that the clergyman to whom the living was offered has felt obliged to withdraw his acceptance owing to financial reasons, coupled with the lack at Brigg of educational facilities for girls.  He regrets any trouble he may have caused by his premature decision in the first instance, and has expressed a wish to apologise to the many kind people in the parish who seemed ready to welcome him if he came.
An interesting piece that suggests all sorts of issues; not least the lack of educational facilities for girls.  This must be beyond the elementary level.


BURRINGHAM
HOME.- Pte. Wm. Arthur Clixby, 1-5th Lincoln Regt., who had been a prisoner of war in Germany over three years, also Pte. Harold Taylor, 2nd. South Staffs. Regt., who had been a prisoner in Germany since the German offensive last March have both reached home safely after their hard experiences.  


MESSINGHAM
PRISONERS OF WAR RETURNED.- We are pleased to see Private B. Bouls and George Maltby home again looking  well and fit.  These two boys have been prisoners in the hands of the Germans for several months.  


BARTON
HOME.- A number of Barton men have been released from  captivity and have come home on leave.  Most of them have received bad treatment from the Germans.


BARROW
HOME AGAIN.- During last week Pte. Fred Fryer, who has been a prisoner since the early days of the war; Lance-Cpl. George Heaton, who has been a prisoner since March, and Pte. James Sargeant, since May, arrived at their native village.


NEW HOLLAND
WELL DONE.- The scholars of the Council School have subscribed, through Miss Binnington, head mistress, 24s. in aid of St. Dunstan's Institute for the Blind.
MILITARY.- Last week Pte. Arthur Walters, who joined up in the early days of the war and for some time a prisoner in Germany arrived home.



GOXHILL
SAD NEWS.- Mr. and Mrs. C. Short have received intelligence that their eldest son, Lance-cpl. W. Short was killed in action on Nov. 6th by a
piece of shell striking him on the head and killing instantaneously.
So sad.


ULCEBY
DIED IN GERMANY.- Mr. and Mrs. Mapplethorpe have received official information that their son Pte. Cyril Mapplethorpe, 2 - 7th Manchester Regt. has died as a prisoner of war in ? Camp, Germany, on Sept. 20th, 1918.  He was joined in January, 1916, and was in ? at Brockton Camp afterwards, proceeded to France.  He was captured by the Germans on March 21st, 1918.


FERRIBY SLUICE
HOME.- Last week two local soldiers arrived home after being prisoners of war in Germany, namely Pte. Herbert Todd and Sergt. Jackson.  The former, who was captured in the spring offensive, gives a terrible account of the privations they had to endure.  He was put in the cook house a few weeks ago, and so did better.  He says he has cooked thousands of dogs and cats and horseflesh galore, and that the prisoners were hungering for it, all showing the state of the country for food.  Many of the weakest died of hunger and exhaustion.  Sergt. Jackson states he was not to write stating what camp he was in when all the time he was behind the German lines carrying stores up and exposed to our fire.  He also gives a terrible account of the privations they have had to endure.


HORKSTOW
OBITUARY.- the interment took place at Winteringham on Tuesday of last week of Mrs. H. G. Johnson, wife of Mr. H. G. Johnson, of this village  Deceased who was only 22 years of age died of pneumonia following influenza.


SCUNTHORPE
PARISH CHURCH.- It been decided to put a marble floor in the sacrarium and to install a new communion rail in the Parish Church as a war memorial. 
ATHLETIC.- Athletic Associations ? all kinds of games, such as football, cricket, hockey, tennis, bowls, etc. are being formed at the various works and now a Frodingham and District Football League has been established which will no doubt create a healthy rivalry amongst the various clubs.
There are a number of reports that would appear to make interesting reading but I find them impossible to read.  You could try by going to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/


Scunthorpe and Its War
Memorial.

PROPOSED MUNICIPAL HOSPITAL

On Tuesday night the first meeting of the general committee appointed to consider a scheme for a permanent War Memorial and also for welcoming the sailors and soldiers when they return home, was held in the Arcade Hall, Scunthorpe. 
There was a large attendance, representatives being present from the various works, Trades Unions, Religious Committees, Tradesmens' Association, Discharged and Disabled Soldiers and Sailors, together with the members of the local councils.  
Mr. H. Wass J.P., and the Rev. T. Boughton, M.A., were nominated for the chair and Mr. Wass was elected by 50 votes to 27.  As there was no other nomination, Mr. Boughton was appointed  vice-chairman.  On the motion of Mr. Wass, seconded by Mr. A. Spencer, Mr  J. W. Storehouse was unanimously elected hon. secretary, and on the motion of Mr. W. E. Hodgson, Mr. W. R. Horsfall of the London City and Midland Bank was unanimously elected treasurer.
Before anything further was done Mr. R. E. Westwood reminded the meeting that some years ago a very strong committee was formed in the district for the endowment of a hospital.  That committee was still in being and was it not advisable to fuse the old committee with the new?  Had it not been for the war intervening a hospital worthy of the district would have been erected by now.
The Chairman said it had not been definitely decided what form the memorial should take and he suggested they should first appoint their officials and committees.  
Mr. Chafer wanted to know what the Ironmasters were going to do and Mr. Spavin, a silver badge man, said that what was wanted was a municipal hospital, not an ironmasters hospital.  
Mr. Westwood replied that the Ironmasters took the lead in the matter some time ago but now that the value of this district was being recognised they would shortly see thus place a hundred thousand strong and the scheme of five years ago would not be anything like the scheme that would come before that committee.  The Ironmasters were quite prepared to help in the fullest sense, as much as before, and more need not be said.  (Applause). 
Mr. A. Spencer said that some months ago the Trades Unions decided that the permanent war memorial should take the form of a municipal hospital.
Mr. F. Staff informed the meeting that Mr. Jas Henderson (chairman of the old Committee) had the promise of about five acres of land on which to erect a hospital and Mr. G. W. Goss  had in his possession plans of different institutions that might be expected.  The ground was not fully promised but had Mr. Henderson been present he would have said it was almost a sure thing. (Applause). 
It was moved by Mr. H. S. McIntosh and carried unanimously that "A general infirmary be erected at once as a war memorial and that an executive committee be elected to consider the ways and means of carrying the scheme out."
A long discussion followed and various resolutions and amendments were moved.  It was ultimately decided that the general Committee shall consist of one of the four delegates representing each organisation.  Replying to Mr. Goss, the Chairman said the Executive would number about eighty members.
Mr. Thurston: That's better. (Laughter.)
The Secretary reported having received a letter from Sir Berkeley Sheffield Bart. to the effect that he would be very pleased to support such a memorial as a hospital both by the giving of land and by an annual subscription towards its upkeep. (Applause.)
On the motion of Mr. McIntosh, the Secretary was instructed to obtain definite information if a municipal hospital --- erected and maintain by the local authorities could be established in such a district as that.
Mr. Wass next raised the question of official welcomes to be given the returning sailors and soldiers from time to time as they are demobilised.  He felt that the men who had been out and fought should recognised and receive some momento by which they would see that those citizens for whom they had been fighting recognised their bravery in going out to fight.
On the motion of Mr. R. Jones J.P., it was unanimously agreed to form a voluntary fund in order to assist necessitous cases among the men who have returned and are about to return.  It was unanimously resolved to protest to the Government and also the Ministry of Pensions against the scurvy treatment of discharged men.
Mr. Laban Cowling, secretary of the local branch of the discharged men's federation, instances a case at Scunthorpe where a man, his wife and three children were practically starving  owing to the inadequate pension.  Mr. Cowling said the discharged men were up against charity but he thought it was up to every citizen to support a civic welcome both to the men who had yet to come back and to the men who had been back years.
The meeting was adjourned until Monday next.
A most interesting article that reveals so much!  The question of how a new hospital should be funded has been an ongoing discussion for some time; perhaps the a memorial hospital to those who have fought and died for their country may bring a satisfactory conclusion.  The makeup of the committee is revealing.
The meeting also gave the opportunity to promote some of the difficulties faced by the returning soldiers. 






THE POLLING IN NORTH LINDSEY
Polling throughout the North Lindsey Division was anything but brisk during the day, but improved towards night.  Enthusiasm was conspicuous by its absence and many voters would not bother to go to the poll. 
Polling day passed off very quietly at Brigg on Saturday.  There were practically  no enthusiasm and party colours were conspicuous by their absence, in fact it was hard to realise that an election was taking place.  There were three polling stations instead of the usual two, and voting was slack during the earlier part of the day but improved towards tea-time.  There are 1,505 names on the register, including 308 absent voters, and if these 750 cast their votes, or about 63 per cent of the total on the register.
In the important industrial area of Frodingham polling was slack during Saturday morning.  From three o'clock until tea time it considerably improved at Scunthorpe, women voters being in the majority.  At 5.30 there were queues waiting to vote at Crosby, but the busiest time throughout the districts was between 6 and 8 pm.  All three candidates toured the constituency, Sir Alfred Gelder the Independent Liberal , being accompanied by Lady Gelder and Miss Gelder in V.A.D. uniform.  Colonel McLean, D.S.O. (the Coalition candidate), who as a bachelor, was accompanied by Lord Hastings, a brother officer.  The colours of the Labour candidate, Mr. David Quibell, predominated, but  the feeling is that notwithstanding the optimism of the local Socialists, Col. McLean, D.S.O. will top the poll.
Saturday's polling at Barton was conducted very quietly, and there was none of that enthusiasm which one might expected, considering the great issues before the country. There were five polling stations (two more than at previous elections), and these were at the Council School.  On the voters' list there were 3,052 names, 2,400 being available on Saturday, and of these 1,224 we're women. These newly-enfranchised voters came up well, and it is probable that out of the approximate number if 1,200 who polled, about half of them were women.   
There was not a party colour to be seen, and there was only one car running - namely, Dr. Morley's - which was used to bring up some voters who lived some distance from the polling place and were unable to walk.
There was an absence of the plural voters and the supporters of Sir Alfred Gelder claim that thus would be to their advantage.  At the close of the poll the ballot boxes, along with those from the neighbouring villages, numbering 17 in all, were locked up in a cell at the Police Station.
In the Messingham district everything passed off very quietly. It certainly was one of the slowest days at election time for many years.  No excitement of any kind marked the day.  The first to poll,(exactly at 8 o'clock) was a lady voter (yeh!) and the last vote cast at 8 o'clock in the evening was by a discharged soldier. During the day two candidates visited the polling station, viz. Lieut.-Col. McLean and Mr. D. J. K. Quibell.  The presiding officials were Messrs C. G. Plummer (presiding officer and A. W. Bristow, poll clerk.  
At Barnetby polling was fairly brisk, no less than 75 per cent registering their votes.  This was the highest percentage in the division.
At Wrawby Mr. Pickup officiated as presiding officer and Mrs. Morris as poll clerk.  There were 341 on the register eligible to vote, and of these 216 exercised their right.
I mistakenly included this in last week's blog but it did appear in the 21st December 1918 issue.

Sunday, 27 January 2019


Welcome to my chosen extracts taken from The Lincolnshire Star for Saturday 14th December 1918.  There are two military deaths: Private E. Skinner of Keelby who died of influenza and Private Reginald Johnson of Scunthorpe who was confirmed dead after being missing for some years.  The influenza epidemic continues to rage across the area and I have chosen reports from Kirton Lindsey and Barton as examples.
On a happier note, prisoners of war are being repatriated, including Cadet S. W. Edwards and Private A. Shepherdson of Barrow and Private James Parkinson of New Holland.  Wonderful.
There is also a report on the attendance at polling stations across the area; the turnout seems to be surprisingly low for such an important election although it can be seen that those women eligible to vote were exercising their right for the first time.  Please do not forger that you can read the full newspaper by going to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/


The Lincolnshire star
Saturday 14th December 1918

BRIGG
THE "FLU" EPIDEMIC.- Poor little Brigg has suffered very seriously from the plague if influenza and many deaths have taken place, and sad to relate amongst our children and grown up lusty men and women, while the older people in many cases have got better.  From what we hear, we believe the number of cases are decreasing, and we trust this terrible infliction may quickly pass away.
LOCAL LABOUR TROUBLES.- A spirit of unease and dissatisfaction with the wages paid the Urban Council's workmen resulted, as we stated last week in the "Star" in noticed throwing up their jobs, being sent on to the local authority although the Council had met the  men's view with a considerable and very reasonable advance of wages.  We hear this little strike to "down spade and brushes" has collapsed and most  of the workmen have asked leave to withdraw their notice showing the truth of the old proverb, "Second thoughts are often best."
Second thoughts by the men or the Council?


BARROW
HOME.- After being interned job Germany for four years and five months, Cadet S. W. Edwards, of the S.S. Aaro, has arrived home.  Pte. A. Shepherdson, who has been a prisoner of war in Germany over two years has also arrived home.  He was missing for two years before his friends received any intimation of his whereabouts.
Wow, soldiers were usually assumed dead after such a length of time.  He would get an ecstatic  welcome home.


KEELBY
FUNERAL. - On Wednesday of last week the remains of the late Pte. E. Skinner (23), R.F.A., were interred in the burial ground.  Deceased was the son of Mrs. Drewery, and only married last spring.  He had served in France nearly throughout the war.  He was gassed and thus was all against his recovery from an attack of influenza, to which to which he succumbed in Newcastle Hospital.  The remains were met at Brocklesby Station, and followed by a squad from Brocklesby camp.  These were joined by the mourners, which included his widow, mother, sister, father-in-law, and many other relatives and friends.  The Rev. Stratton officiated.  Three volleys were fired, and two buglers sounded "The Last Post."  There were some beautiful floral tributes.   


WOOTTON
IN CONSTANTINOPLE.- Major Walter Giffard formerly of the Oxford and Bucks Light Infantry, has served for a period of many months on the Headquarter's Staff at Salonika.  He is now in Constantinople and it is interesting to know that he carried the official flag into the city and planted it on the British Military Headquarters.  His journey hereto was remarkable, part of it was on a torpedo boat destroyer and part on a seaplane ship arriving in or about Nov. 12th.  He states that prices prevailing are ruinous.   For a three-course dinner £3 is asked and 8s. is charged for a bottle of beer.  Captain Stephen Giffard of the Royal Air Force us probably now on the banks of the Rhine.


NEW HOLLAND
HOME.- Private James Parkinson, one of the five sons of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Parkinson serving in H.M. Forces, arrived home on Saturday night of last week after being a prisoner of war in Germany since March last.  On Sunday afternoon he was given a public welcome, the Railwaymen's Silver Band parading the village and Mr. Willey (lay preacher), gave an address of welcome in front of his home.  He has suffered a good deal from hunger, even old cabbage leaves and other refuse being eaten to allay its pangs.   


ALKBORO
WEDDING-. On Wednesday of last week a pretty wedding took place in the Primitive Methodist Church.  The contracting parties were Miss Bertha Tyson, of this village and Mr. E. Maddison, of Burton, of the Royal Navy.  The bride was attired in cream crepe de chine with that to match.  The two bridesmaids, Miss Florence Maddison (sister of the bridegroom) and Miss Agnes Tyson (sister of the bride) were prettily attired in dresses of brown velvet with hats to match.  A reception was afterwards held in the schoolroom.
I like a good wedding.


KIRTON LINDSEY
OBITUARY - .The death of  Mrs. W. Broughton, wife if Mr. Wm. Broughton, stock dealer, at the age of 34 years, has occasioned sincere regret in the whole countryside, following so close upon the death of her only son, who was interred only two days previously, as reported last week.  The husband at the time of writing happily showed signs of recovery and to him, and the only remaining child deepest sympathy is extended.  The interment of Mrs. Broughton took place on Friday.  The Rev. L. P. Hardaker conducted the ceremony both at the Wesleyan Church and at the graveside.  Many relations and friends were present at the obsequies.


BARTON
THE "FLU.- The epidemic is fast abating here.  There have been several deaths, the last to succumb being a discharged soldier, Mr. Horace Wilson (20), lately a drummer in the Lincolnshire Regiment.
WAR MEMORIAL.- A committee has been formed to consider a proposal to erect a memorial to the fallen brave, who number over 170.  The Vicar (Rev. W. E. Varah) in the Church Magazine for this month, writes that, "Four bells at St. Mary's duly inscribed, and a bronze tablet recording the names and deaths, has been suggested as a suitable way of keeping them in remembrance and of associating their heroism with the past history of our ancient town."  The committee formed comprises men of all religious denominations and several schemes of memorials are likely to be submitted for consideration.


SCUNTHORPE
ROLL OF HONOUR.- There are now about 190 names on the Roll of Honour in connection with the Wesleyan Church, and to mist of the N.C.O.'s and men are still with the colours a postal order for 7s. 6d. is to be sent as a Christmas gift.  104 were despatched last week. 
SUPREME SACRIFICE.- Pte. Reginald Johnson 12-13 Northumberland Fusiliers, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Johnson, 104, Mary St., Scunthorpe who had been reported missing since May 28th. is now stated to have been killed on that date.
SILVER CHALLENGE CUP.- A silver challenge cup has been presented to the Frodingham and District Football League by the Lincolnshire Ironmasters Association us to be played for annually.  A set of gold medals for the winners and silver for the runner-up has also been given.  The league is now in full swing and matches will be played every week until the end of the season.

Many column inches are given to the election, you can read them by going to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/


THE POLLING IN NORTH LINDSEY
Polling throughout the North Lindsey Division was anything but brisk during the day, but improved towards night.  Enthusiasm was conspicuous by its absence and many voters would not bother to go to the poll. 
Polling day passed off very quietly at Brigg on Saturday.  There were practically  no enthusiasm and party colours were conspicuous by their absence, in fact it was hard to realise that an election was taking place.  There were three polling stations instead of the usual two, and voting was slack during the earlier part of the day but improved towards tea-time.  There are 1,505 names on the register, including 308 absent voters, and if these 750 cast their votes, or about 63 per cent of the total on the register.
In the important industrial area of Frodingham polling was slack during Saturday morning.  From three o'clock until tea time it considerably improved at Scunthorpe, women voters being in the majority.  At 5.30 there were queues waiting to vote at Crosby, but the busiest time throughout the districts was between 6 and 8 pm.  All three candidates toured the constituency, Sir Alfred Gelder the Independent Liberal , being accompanied by Lady Gelder and Miss Gelder in V.A.D. uniform.  Colonel McLean, D.S.O. (the Coalition candidate), who is a bachelor, was accompanied by Lord Hastings, a brother officer.  The colours of the Labour candidate, Mr. David Quibell, predominated, but  the feeling is that notwithstanding the optimism of the local Socialists, Col. McLean, D.S.O. will top the poll.
Saturday's polling at Barton was conducted very quietly, and there was none of that enthusiasm which one might expected, considering the great issues before the country. There were five polling stations (two more than at previous elections), and these were at the Council School.  On the voters' list there were 3,052 names, 2,400 being available on Saturday, and of these 1,224 we're women. These newly-enfranchised voters came up well, and it is probable that out of the approximate number if 1,200 who polled, about half of them were women.   
There was not a party colour to be seen, and there was only one car running - namely, Dr. Morley's - which was used to bring up some voters who lived some distance from the polling place and were unable to walk.
There was an absence of the plural voters and the supporters of Sir Alfred Gelder claim that thus would be to their advantage.  At the close of the poll the ballot boxes, along with those from the neighbouring villages, numbering 17 in all, were locked up in a cell at the Police Station.
In the Messingham district everything passed off very quietly. It certainly was one of the slowest days at election time for many years.  No excitement of any kind marked the day.  The first to poll, (exactly at 8 o'clock) was a lady voter and the last vote cast at 8 o'clock in the evening was by a discharged soldier. During the day two candidates visited the polling station, viz. Lieut.-Col. McLean and Mr. D. J. K. Quibell.  The presiding officials were Messrs C. G. Plummer (presiding officer) and A. W. Bristow, poll clerk.  
At Barnetby polling was fairly brisk, no less than 75 per cent registering their votes.  This was the highest percentage in the division.
At Wrawby Mr. Pickup officiated as presiding officer and Mrs. Morris as poll clerk.  There were 341 on the register eligible to vote, and if these 216 exercised their right.
The report is a little 'scrappy' but revealing nonetheless.  I am surprised that the turnout was so low for such an important election and it would be interesting to see if this followed a national trend.  However,  women (those who were eligible) did seem to take advantage of their first opportunity to vote.



Welcome to my chosen selection of extracts taken from The Lincolnshire Star for Saturday 7th December 1918.  There are two reports of military deaths, both due to influenza: Private Walter Baxter of Great Limber who died in Grimsby and Corporal Ernest T. Drinkall of Burringham who died in France.  The influenza epidemic is still raging in North Lincolnshire with many deaths being reported.  I have used reports from Brigg, Messingham, Broughton, Burringham and Scunthorpe as examples.
Fund raising events for 'the boys' continue although these are now held under 'happier conditions'.  Hear, hear.  Please do not forget that you can read the full newspaper by going to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/


The Lincolnshire Star
Saturday 7th December 1918

BRIGG
LABOUR TROUBLES.- At a special meeting of the Urban Council on Wednesday night, Mr. Potter, of Hull, the local organiser of the Labour Union, was present and a long discussion took place with regard to the wages of the workmen employed by the local authorities.  We understand the Council's suggestion of a substantial increase of wages did not meet with the approval of Mr. Potter and that under his guidance the men have sent in their notices.
I hope that this is wise advice and guidance.
THE HAND OF DEATH.- The hand of death has fallen heavily in the town during the past week.  In addition to those to whom we refer in other parts of our columns, we regret to say there passed away on Saturday night, Mr. Reg Firth,  a well-known newsagent who with his sister (whose death occurred the previous day) was interred in the Cemetery on Tuesday last.  Amongst others who have died during the past week are Tom Brown, a well known character and a little boy named William Fowler, whilst on Wednesday last two other children also died.  It is now hoped that the epidemic of illness is subsiding as at the time if writing no fresh cases are reported.


NORTH KELSEY
FOR THE BOYS.- On Thursday evening week a splendid concert and entertainment was given in the Council Schools by the "Twilight Entertainments" when a good programme of sketches, solos, etc. was rendered.  Miss Sybil Vessey, of Barnetby was the accompanist.  The proceedings which were under the auspices of the "North Kelsey Our Boys Fund" resulted in the handsome sum of over £11 being raised for the above object, which is a matter of congratulations to the energetic organisers of this and other similar efforts for the help and comfort of the boys.  Mr. E. Topliss was secretary to the promoters and Mr. F. Ralphs is secretary to the "Our Boys Charity Committee".  The following contributed to the programme: Mr. E. Topliss, Mrs. Percival, Corpl. Vaughan, Mr. H. Gibbons, Miss E. Bowness and Mr. W. Johnson.  


BARROW
LECTURE.- The third of the series of winter lectures inaugurated by the Rev. W. D. Stedman, vicar, was given on Thursday night of last week by Mr. W. Claridge M.A. J.P. of Bradford.  The subject was "Egypt, the Land of the Pyramids."


MESSINGHAM
INFLUENZA EPIDEMIC.- Much sickness is still rampant in the village, most homes have one or more cases of illness, in some instances the whole of the family is confined indoors.  Several deaths have taken place during the last week, viz: Mrs. Harry Stocks, Mrs Carline, Mr. Thom Burrell and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Benson's daughter.  The whole of the village is in deep sympathy for the friends and relations who have suffered such sad bereavements during the past few days.  It is many years since so many homes were made sad to this extent.  Mrs. Stocks, the wife of Councillor Henry Stocks, was most highly respected by all who knew her and the deepest sympathy is expressed to Mr. Stocks and his daughter and two sons.  Mr. Stocks has lost one son during the war and another was badly wounded. - Mr. Thomas Burrell, was a farmer, and most highly respected by everyone for his sterling character and uprightedness.  He was a member if the Primitive Society.  Everyone deeply sympathises with his widow and young son and daughter.  - Mrs. Carline will be much missed by her husband and two children and relatives and friends. - Mr.  and Mrs. Frank Benson have the sympathy of all the parish in the loss of their young daughter.  There are still many cases in the village requiring great care and medical attention.  It is sincerely hoped that the epidemic will soon be over and the village cleared of this scourge.


BROUGHTON
DEATHS.- There have been several deaths in the village during the past fortnight.  On Monday there were six corpses in the village.  There are several cases of influenza at the present time.
P.M. CHURCH.- In this place of worship on Wednesday last the Rev. E. Dalton, D.D., of Hull preached in the afternoon, after which a public tea was held.  In the evening the Dr. Rev. Dalton gave his popular lecture on "My trip to Southern Europe and Palestine."  Mr. J. H. Oglesby presided and collections were taken in aid of the Circuit Funds. 
 OBITUARY.- Much sympathy is expressed with Mr. F. F. Ayre of this village in the loss of his wife through pneumonia.  Deceased who leaves a family of four little children, was interred on Wednesday.  The funeral also took place of Mrs. Nixon, wife if Mr. G. Nixon.  The deceased was highly respected, always having a cheery word for everyone. 


WORLABY
FOR THE LADS.- Great success attended the attended the annual event on behalf of the local soldiers and sailors held recently in the school.  The sum of £40 was raised.  The effort comprised a sale of works, concerts, and various competitions, jumble etc.  The Vicar, the Rev. H. W. Shape, said he rejoiced that they had all met once again but under happier conditions.  The parish had done well for local soldiers and he congratulated them for their good work. 


GREAT LIMBER
INTERMENT.- The remains of Private Walter Baxter, of the Royal Sussex Regt., were laid to rest in Limber Churchyard on Thursday, the Rev. G. W. Borlase M.A. (vicar) officiating.  Deceased was a son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Baxter.  Pte. Baxter died at Grimsby Hospital from the after effects of influenza on the Sunday previous.  He came home on leave about a fortnight ago, and was at once taken ill.  He enlisted in the 1st Lincoln's  in March, 1915, and had been wounded. 


BURRINGHAM
THE "FLU".- This epidemic shows a decline in virulence.  During last week there were four deaths, making a total of 14 for the fortnight.
DIED IN FRANCE.- We regret to record the death of Corpl. Ernest T.
Drinkall, R.E. Signal Section, which has occurred at a casualty clearing section in France,  after an attack of influenza, followed by pneumonia.  Much sympathy has been extended to his widowed mother and the other members of the family.
WINTERTON
MEETINGS.- In support of the candidature of Sir Alfred Gelder, a well attended meeting was held in the Gladstone Hall on Friday night.  Several ladies including Lady Gelder, Mrs. Dixon and Miss Spilman occupied seats on the platform.  The Chairman was Mr. A. E. Spencer, of Hunmanby, in place of Mr. J. R. Spilman, J.P., who was suffering from a severe cold.  The candidate was supported on the platform by Rev. W. H. Heep, Hull, Messrs Whitaker (Scunthorpe), Browton, Hodlin and others.  - A meeting in support of Mr. D. Quibell (Labour candidate) was held on Tuesday night in the Gladstone Hall.  There was a good audience and the candidate was received with applause.  Other speakers were Mr. Pittwood and Mr. Newbert who stated the aims of the Labour Party.


Sir Alfred Gelder at
Brumby and Crosby

This is a very long piece but does deserve a reading.  Go to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/


SCUNTHORPE
EPIDEMIC.- The influenza plague has been responsible for many deaths in North Lincolnshire and 13 persons were interred in the Scunthorpe Cemetery last week, and five more graves were ordered on Monday.

There are many other interesting reports under the 'Scunthorpe' heading but they are very difficult to read.  



Memorial to the Fallen
"THEIR NAME LIVETH FOR
EVERMORE"
Mr. Kipling's selection from Ecclesiastics of the phrase, "Their name liveth for evermore" as the best inscription for the memorial stone devised by The Imperial War Graves Commission, could surely not be better, even from the Bible itself.  There may be others like the sentence beginning "I have fought the good fight" but there is none one can call to mind that makes so universal an appeal nor which, by its association with a noble eulogy of famous men, creates so chastening an atmosphere.  


THE STORY OF THE ZEPP.
RAID IN SCUNTHORPE
Now that the restrictions are removed, it is possible to tell the story of the Zeppelin raid over the Scunthorpe district on the night of January 31st. 1916.  It was the only time that a Zeppelin dropped bombs in the district and lasted about 8 1/2 minutes, during which time 20 high explosive bombs and about 50 incendiary were dropped.  The first bomb was dropped in Ravendale St., Scunthorpe, at 10.45p.m., and the backs were blown in of four houses, and windows smashed and ceilings cracked in not only the houses adjoining but on the opposite side of the street and even in Mary St. and other streets near. 
A large number of incendiary bombs were next dropped in the Glebe Pit and one high explosive in the paddock at the top of Trafford St. broke nearly all the windows in the neighbourhood.  Another was dropped clean through the sewer in the Wheatlands, and an incendiary was dropped through the roof of a cottage in Dawes Lane occupied by an old lady named Mrs. Markham, over 80 years of age.  She was just about to retire for the night, and thinking the missile was from one of the blast furnaces she coolly threw a bucket of water over it.  A neighbour then ran in and threw the bomb out of the window.  Other bombs were dropped between the Foundry and Lord St. Oswald's mine offices, and in the North Lincolnshire Ironworks yard, much damage was done to a railway truck.  During the raid three men were killed.  A bomb dropped in the Redbourn Hill Iron and Coal Co's yard killed Thomas Dawson, the old Scunthorpe United goalkeeper and Jack Cyril Wright, an Ashby man, and a high explosive which fell near Dawes Lane killed a workman at the Trent Ironworks, Wilkinson Benson, of Ethel Terrace, Scunthorpe.  At least three aerial torpedoes were dropped on the Redbourn slag bank, where a fire was burning in a devil to prevent the engine going over the end of the bank when tipping slag. 
I am sure that some of this would have been public knowledge but it is clear that reporting restrictions were in place.






Tuesday, 22 January 2019


Welcome to my chosen extracts taken from The Lincolnshire Star for Saturday 30th November.  Four military deaths are reported the first being Private Harold Smith from Brocklesby who died of influenza in France and the others were killed in action; Private Charles W. Brompton of Wootton; Private H. Turgoose of Keadby and a soldier (whose name is impossible to read) from Kirton Lindsey who had served in the Worcester Regiment.  The influenza epidemic continues to claim civilian lives across the area and I have included reports from Burringham and Broughton as examples.  Some very sad stories of both military and civilian deaths.
Many column inches are given to the forthcoming general election with reports of meetings being held by the prospective candidates: David Quibell (Labour); Lieut-Col. McLean (Coalition) and Sir Alfred Gelder (Liberal).  The reports relate to electioneering rhetoric but do provide a fascinating insight into both the aspirations for the country following the armistice and the attitude towards the people of Germany.  I am sure that someone could do a good analysis of the sentiments and the language use.  Please do not forget that the newspaper can be read in full by going to: http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/
The Lincolnshire Star
Saturday 30th November 1918

BRIGG
FOR THE DISABLED.- The whist drive held last week in the Manor House by kind permission of Mrs Stuart, resulted in the sum of £10 being raised for the Disabled Soldiers' and Sailors' Fund.  The flag-day held on Thursday, also for the above fund realised £11.
The fundraising continues!


BROCKLESBY
DIED IN FRANCE.- The greatest sympathy is felt for Mr. J. Smith, the popular huntsman, Mrs. Smith and family, in the sad loss they have sustained by the death of Private Harold Smith, in France. Deceased was the only surviving son, and before being called up was employed as clerk in the National Provincial Bank, Victoria St., Grimsby.  On Friday, Mr. and Mrs. Smith were summoned to France, the message stating their son was dangerously ill with influenza.  Unfortunately he died the same day.


WOOTTON
KILLED IN ACTION.- Pte Charles W. Brompton, 1-5th Lincoln's, and formally of the Lincs. Imperial Yeomanry, was killed in action on Nov. 7th.  He enlisted on May 30th, 1915, and has been in France for the past two years.  Deceased was the third son of Mr and Mrs. Chas Brompton of Wootton, whose cup of sorrow has lately been filled to overflowing.  Fourteen months ago, their only daughter died suddenly.  On April 18th of the present year, their second son Arthur, died of wounds received in France, and now when the order to "cease fire" has been given, official news is received that further casualty occurred just 4 days previous to the signing of the armistice.  The whole of Mr. and Mrs. Brompton's four sons were soldiers of whom two are now dead, and the eldest (Ernest) is in hospital in Scotland, having been twice wounded.  Many expressions of regret and sympathy have been extended to the bereaved parents, whose family circles has been so quickly depleted of its loved ones.


GREAT LIMBER
RECITAL.- In the Parish Church on Wednesday week an organ recital in aid of the War Memorial Fund, was given by Private A. A. H. Andrews.  Sapper T.W. P. Barrett sang the solos.  The function was well attended and both the playing  of Private Andrews, and the singing of Sapper Barrett were greatly appreciated.  The collection realised £2 15s. 6d.


BARROW
SIAM HONOUR.- Mr. Thomas Codd, of the Royal Siamese State Railway, son of Mr. and Mrs. Drewery Codd, has had conferred upon him the Order of the Crown of Siam for services rendered.  He served his apprenticeship as an engineer with the Great Central Railway at New Holland and Gorton. 



GOXHILL
MEMORIAL SERVICE.- On Sunday night at the Primitive Methodist Chapel a service was conducted by the Rev. C. H. Marsh to the memory of Private John Wm. Foulston, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Boylston, the Marsh, and Herbert Moore, mine sweeper, R.N.R., who have given their lives for their country.


BURRINGHAM
INFLUENZA VICTIMS.- At Burringham, owing to the influenza epidemic, nine persons have died in a week.  About as many persons as usually die in a year.  In one family the mother and father, aged 36 and 39 respectively, died within a day of each other, and their two young children are both suffering from this complaint.  Two children in another family have also succumbed.  The day school has been closed by the County Council Medical Officer of Health during the past two weeks.  All the Sunday schools are also closed.  The village has never before experienced such a terrible time.  In Gunness there are many cases but no fatalities.


BROUGHTON
THE "FLU".- The influenza is very bad in the village.  Three deaths have taken place in one house within a week.
LABOUR.- Mr. Quibell, Labour candidate addressed a meeting in the school room and was assisted by Mr. Smith.  There was not a large attendance.
WESLEYAN CHAPEL.- On Sunday, Mr. Tippet preached morning and evening.  Miss Robinson, of Scunthorpe, sang the solos "Does Jesus Care," and "Calvary" at the evening service, which was much appreciated.  The collection was for the Circuit Funds.
FOR THE FALLEN.- On Friday evening a parish meeting was called to consider a scheme to perpetuate the memory of those who had fallen in the great war and gratitude for the safety of those who had lived through such great perils.  There was a large attendance of parishioners at the meeting and after considerable discussion it was decided to build a Town Hall, if the necessary land can be acquired.


KEADBY
PRISONER OF WAR.- Mr. J. Smith of North End, has received news from his son, Pte. A. Smith, Royal Engineers, who is a prisoner of war in Germany, saying he is well, and hoping to be home again soon.
KILLED IN ACTION. - Mr. and Mrs. Turgoose, Station Road, have received official news that their son, Pte. H. Turgoose, 4th Staffordshire Regt., was killed on action on March 21st., 1918.  Thus news comes very sad after long waiting and it is the second son killed in the war.


ALTHORPE
EXPECTED HOME.- The friends of Captain H. Stephenson, M.C., are looking forward with confidence to seeing him at his home at Althorpe in the course of the next few days.  Captain Stephenson was one of the first Mesopotamian expedition under General Townsend, which after the long siege of Kit, finally surrendered upon April 30th. 1916.  He was mentioned in despatches and awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous work at Shaiba just before the commencement of the siege.



HIBALDSTOW
MEETING.- A public meeting in support of the candidature of Sir Alfred Gelder, was held in the Council School on Tuesday evening when addresses were given by Mr. J. Spring of Brigg and Sir Alfred Gelder.  Mr. W. J. Andrew was the chairman.




Mr. D. Quibell the Labour
Candidate for North
Lindsey.

ENTHUSIASTIC MEETING AT
SCUNTHORPE

At a well attended conference of the Brigg Divisional Labour Party, held in the L.L.P. Hall, Scunthorpe, on Saturday night.  Mr. D. J. K. Quibell was unanimously and enthusiastically adopted as the Labour candidate for the North Lindsey (Brigg) Division.  Mr. Tim Holmes presided supported by Mr. E. Pittwood ( sec). 
Mr. Quibell, who was loudly cheered, said that he knew they had that night been recording a decision that to many was rather late in the day, and that it would have been better had that decision been arrived at three weeks ago.  It was, however, better late than never and in his opinion they still had a chance if everybody would do their bit.  The present political situation locally was unique.  They had two coalition candidates, the Liberal being adopted on the Saturday and the Unionist coalition candidate on the Monday - at least he was then confirmed by the Central Committee.  He had heard it said that the men on the works were going to support the Coalition Government and so enable it to finish the work which it had begun.  The function of a representative Government in the speaker's opinion was that each member should form his own judgement and then record his conviction but in a Coalition Government the member became merely an automatum to register the decrees of Government, and all he (the speaker) could say was that they should be to fight for a strong I.L.P. and to so influence the electorate that in time they would be able to create a party that could form a Government itself.  If they were ever going to have a strong Labour party it would have to be Independent - to have its own whips and have an independent and labour party in the House of Commons.  At a meeting held recently in London, at which both Mr. Bonar Law and Mr. Lloyd George were present, it was made public that the Government for some little time should control certain business establishments.  At the present time they had the railways and the Labour Party would strive to retain the Government control of the railways. (Applause).  It was the same with shipping and the speaker considered the latter as important the railways and that our Government should copy Canada and Australia with respect to it.  There was also the question if controlled establishments such as they had in that district - the extensions at which had been largely subsidised by grants made from the excess profits tax.  The speaker quoted figures in support of his statement and said that so far as the Labour party was concerned the Government would never take its hands off those controlled establishments.  Referring to the soldiers who had fought for the empire and who would soon be returning, Mr. Quibell said that they were told that they had been fighting for a different Empire, and he hoped that in its social reconstruction Labour would lay the corner stones - that it would be an empire in which militarism had ceased to be the driving force and in which there would be universal peace.  That it would be an empire of happier homes and of greater freedom and an Empire that would generously provide for the widows, the orphans and the maimed.  If England were old, she was not decrepit and had still within her that daring and elasticity that gave great promise for the future.  In the blood stained spurs and passes of the Balkans and the Hills of Gallipoli and on the plains of Flanders men had given stricken evidence that there is a nation that lives far beyond the confines of the Government offices at Westminster, and they had demonstrated their right to a greater share of human life and happiness which is the born inheritance if every human life. (Applause). 
Asked by a Colonial who had done his bit, if, in the event of his being returned he would do all on his power to give the English Tommy the same rate of pay (viz 6s. per day) as the Colonials had Mr. Quibell replied "most emphatically, yes."  His one regret had been that the men at home had not shown the same enthusiasm for the men who were risking their lives, and had not struck for the 12 1/2 per cent to be paid the men who were soldiers one day and citizens the next.  (Loud applause). 


KIRTON LINDSEY

DIED IN GERMANY.  - There is a report about a Corporal John ? of the Worcester Regt. but unfortunately it is impossible to read.  You could try by going to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/  page 2.



SCUNTHORPE
MEETINGS.- On Saturday night Lieut.-Col. Chas. Wesley Weldon McLean, D.S.O., addressed a crowded meeting of his supporters at the Constitutional Club.  Mr. J. J. W. Graham presided, and the candidate had a good response.


CROSBY
MEETING.- In spite of the very bad weather which prevailed on Tuesday evening, a large crowd of electors, male and female, made their way to the Crosby Council School where Col. McLean had been billed to address his first public meeting in the Ironstone area, but it was deemed necessary to obtain a more commodious building.  The Rev. C. Usher-Wilson , Vicar of Crosby, very generously allowed the Crosby Mission Room to be used and this was soon filled to its ?? capacity.  Mr. W. J. Brooke presided and was supported by the Rev. Usher-Wilson, the Rev. Father Askew, and Mr. L. Farnworth of London. 
MR. QUIBELL AT CROSBY
Following his campaign for the coming general election, the Labour candidate, Mr. D. J. K. Quibell addressed a large meeting in the Crosby Parish Room on Thursday evening under the presidency of Mr. W. Newbery.
The candidate had the support of Mr. Alf. Lonsdale, who spoke at some length.  In the course of his remarks Mr. Lonsdale pointed out that this was the first opportunity he had had as a man of 50 years of age of assisting in the choice of candidate, and he made that statement to prove that so far as our so called democracy exists it was a very narrow one indeed. 


SIR ALFRED GELDER OPENS HIS
CAMPAIGN
Sir Alfred Gelder, Liberal candidate for the Brigg Division for eight years member for this constituency, commenced his electioneering campaign on Monday by visiting parts of the division which has been included in the present North Lindsey Division.  Kirton Lindsey was the venue of the meeting and Sir Alfred had the support of Mr. G. J. Bentham, M.P.,
for the Gainsboro Division, and both speakers were recorded a rousing reception.
On Tuesday night Scawby and Hibaldstow were visited by Sir Alfred where again large audiences greeted the candidate.  On Wednesday evening Sir Alfred spoke at Kirmington and Ulceby, whilst on Thursday night he addressed meetings at Barnetby, Wrawby and Elsham.  



Coalition Meeting at Brigg
LIEUT.-COL. MCLEAN OFFICIALLY
APPOINTED CANDIDATE
The official Coalition candidate had a hearty reception at the Corn Exchange Hall, Brigg, on Monday night.
On the stage were noticed, supporting Lieut.-Colonial G. W. W. McLean, were Mr. H. J. Hope-Barton who presided, Mr. J. Farnsworth, Lieut.-Col. and Mrs. Sutton Nelthorpe, Lady Yarborough, Mrs. H. J. Hope-Barton, Miss Hill, Mr. J. Landers, Mr. J. H. Sergeant and Mr. W. H. Hales.
Mr. R. N. Sutton Nelthorpe should have taken the chair, but to the regret of all he was indisposed and a letter was read from him hoping that Col. McLean would be well supported.  Letters of apology for non attendance was also read from Lord Yarborough and Mr. J. H. Skevington C.C.

This is a very long piece which I should, in order to prevent bias, have transcribed in full.  However, the full report can be read by going to http://www.northlincslibrary.co.uk/ page 3.  The following is the end of the piece.
The Chairman read out a resolution thanking Col. McLean for his address.
Mr. J. H. Sergeant in supporting, proposed a vote of confidence in Col. McLean, stating he had done 'his bit' in France and done it manually.  Those who had fought the battles should have a say in dictating peace.  The Germans were born brutes and still remained so.  It was up to them to work for Col. McLean.
Mr. W. H. Hales in seconding said Col. had fought for them and he should be worthy to represent them in Parliament.  Lieut.-Col. McLean in acknowledging the vote said he hoped he should be able to fulfil all their hopes and wishes if returned for the Brigg Division.  A vote of thanks by Mr. Fanthorpe, seconded by Lieut.-Col. Nelthorpe, was suitably acknowledged and the National Anthem brought the meeting to a close.


HOMAGE TO NURSE CAVELL
The Belgian Councillor of Justice, M. Moordecker, and the French Captain Benoit Stein, who is attached to the Staff of Military Administration, accompanied the members of the Communal Council to the Evere Cemetery to lay wreaths on the graves of Belgian soldiers.
The party then went to the slot where Nurse Cavell is buried.  There they saluted the dead , 41 others shot by the Germans being buried close by.  
"They knelt with deep emotion at the grave of the British national heroine, Miss Edith Cavell, who rests among the Allied martyrs" says a telegram sent by the Military Governor of Western Flanders to the vice-president  of the Imperial Graves Committee at the British Headquarters.